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Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton

Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton transports patients to new location

By Cpl. Brianna Christensen | Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton | December 15, 2013

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One of the first patients at Camp Pendleton’s newest hospital, Lance Cpl. Lucia Y. Cabral, watches her husband, Pfc. Nicholas M. Cabral, marvel at their newborn baby. The Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton facility, built in 1969, was officially decommissioned, requiring patients to be relocated to Pendleton’s recently built, 500,000-square foot, replacement hospital Dec. 14. The four-floor building cost $456 million and took more than three years to construct. Lucia is a maintenance management specialist and Nicholas is a warehouse clerk with1st Marine Logistics Group.

One of the first patients at Camp Pendleton’s newest hospital, Lance Cpl. Lucia Y. Cabral, watches her husband, Pfc. Nicholas M. Cabral, marvel at their newborn baby. The Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton facility, built in 1969, was officially decommissioned, requiring patients to be relocated to Pendleton’s recently built, 500,000-square foot, replacement hospital Dec. 14. The four-floor building cost $456 million and took more than three years to construct. Lucia is a maintenance management specialist and Nicholas is a warehouse clerk with1st Marine Logistics Group. (Photo by Cpl. Derrick K. Irions)


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Pfc. Nicholas M. Cabral and wife, Lance Cpl. Lucia Y. Cabral, take turns holding their newborn baby at Camp Pendleton’s newest hospital. The Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton facility, built in 1969, was officially decommissioned, requiring patients to be relocated to Pendleton’s recently built, 500,000-square foot, replacement hospital Dec. 14. The four-floor building cost $456 million and took more than three years to construct. Lucia is a maintenance management specialist and Nicholas is a warehouse clerk with1st Marine Logistics Group.

Pfc. Nicholas M. Cabral and wife, Lance Cpl. Lucia Y. Cabral, take turns holding their newborn baby at Camp Pendleton’s newest hospital. The Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton facility, built in 1969, was officially decommissioned, requiring patients to be relocated to Pendleton’s recently built, 500,000-square foot, replacement hospital Dec. 14. The four-floor building cost $456 million and took more than three years to construct. Lucia is a maintenance management specialist and Nicholas is a warehouse clerk with1st Marine Logistics Group. (Photo by Cpl. Derrick K. Irions)


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Pfc. Nicholas M. Cabral and wife, Lance Cpl. Lucia Y. Cabral, admire their newborn baby during a post partum stay at Camp Pendleton’s newest hospital. The Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton facility, built in 1969, was officially decommissioned, requiring patients to be relocated to Pendleton’s recently built, 500,000-square foot, replacement hospital Dec. 14. The four-floor building cost $456 million and took more than three years to construct. Lucia is a maintenance management specialist and Nicholas is a warehouse clerk with1st Marine Logistics Group.

Pfc. Nicholas M. Cabral and wife, Lance Cpl. Lucia Y. Cabral, admire their newborn baby during a post partum stay at Camp Pendleton’s newest hospital. The Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton facility, built in 1969, was officially decommissioned, requiring patients to be relocated to Pendleton’s recently built, 500,000-square foot, replacement hospital Dec. 14. The four-floor building cost $456 million and took more than three years to construct. Lucia is a maintenance management specialist and Nicholas is a warehouse clerk with1st Marine Logistics Group. (Photo by Cpl. Derrick K. Irions)


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After being transported, Lance Cpl. Lucia Cabral is lowered from an ambulance by emergency medical technicians. The Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton facility, built in 1969, was officially decommissioned, requiring patients to be relocated to Pendleton’s recently built, 500,000-square foot, replacement hospital Dec. 14. The four-floor building cost $456 million and took more than three years to construct. Cabral is a maintenance management specialist with1st Marine Logistics Group.

After being transported, Lance Cpl. Lucia Cabral is lowered from an ambulance by emergency medical technicians. The Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton facility, built in 1969, was officially decommissioned, requiring patients to be relocated to Pendleton’s recently built, 500,000-square foot, replacement hospital Dec. 14. The four-floor building cost $456 million and took more than three years to construct. Cabral is a maintenance management specialist with1st Marine Logistics Group. (Photo by Cpl. Derrick K. Irions)


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Emergency medical technicians escort Lance Cpl. Lucia Cabral and her newborn child to their room. The Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton facility, built in 1969, was officially decommissioned, requiring patients to be relocated to Pendleton’s recently built, 500,000-square foot, replacement hospital Dec. 14. The four-floor building cost $456 million and took more than three years to construct. Cabral is a maintenance management specialist with1st Marine Logistics Group.

Emergency medical technicians escort Lance Cpl. Lucia Cabral and her newborn child to their room. The Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton facility, built in 1969, was officially decommissioned, requiring patients to be relocated to Pendleton’s recently built, 500,000-square foot, replacement hospital Dec. 14. The four-floor building cost $456 million and took more than three years to construct. Cabral is a maintenance management specialist with1st Marine Logistics Group. (Photo by Cpl. Derrick K. Irions)


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Emergency medical technicians began their process of relocating patients by securing an infant’s car seat to a gurney for transportation. The Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton facility, built in 1969, was officially decommissioned, requiring patients to be relocated to Pendleton’s, recently built, 500,000-square foot replacement hospital Dec. 14. The four-floor building cost $456 million and took more than three years to construct.

Emergency medical technicians began their process of relocating patients by securing an infant’s car seat to a gurney for transportation. The Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton facility, built in 1969, was officially decommissioned, requiring patients to be relocated to Pendleton’s, recently built, 500,000-square foot replacement hospital Dec. 14. The four-floor building cost $456 million and took more than three years to construct. (Photo by Cpl. Derrick K. Irions)


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CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. --

Naval Hospital transported 16 patients from their old location to the new hospital Dec. 14.

The hospital has been transferring their services to the new location over a two week period. Now that all of the patients have been moved there are no longer any services being provided at the old hospital.

“The move went according to schedule,” said Navy Cmdr. Billy McCarty, the chief of medical staff at the hospital. “We started promptly at 7 a.m. and we executed the delivery of patients according to plan,” said Navy Cmdr. Billy McCarty, the chief of medical staff at the hospital.”

Emergency medical technicians were escorted through the hospital to pick up patients, who were put into ambulances and transported to the new hospital. The movement of patients took approximately three and a half hours.

“The move went quite smoothly,” said Navy Cmdr. Dale Ramirez, the director of branch clinics and the officer-in-charge of the new location during the two-week transition. “A lot of planning and preparation has gotten us to this point and we were able to safely move our patients without any hiccups.”

The hospital conducted patient relocation drills on Nov. 15 to practice moving their patients. The practice run was critical because it allowed the staff to identify issues and fins solutions according to Ramirez.

“The training was crucial; everything we prepped for is what we did today,” said McCarty. “Going through the steps, knowing what we needed, projections of how many patients we would need to transfer; the preparation was needed for today to run as smoothly as it did.”

The patients, as well as the staff are excited to be a part of the news hospital, according to Ramirez.

“I have received a lot of feedback from our patients,” said Ramirez. “People are so enamored by the beauty of this building. There was one patient I spoke to who had PTSD and he said ‘when I look at this place I think of a place that is peaceful’, he said he usually goes to a hospital and instantly wants to leave, but he comes here and feels better. I am excited to know that the care we already provide to our patients will be intensified because we now have this state of the art hospital.”



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