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Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton

Change your clock, change your battery

By Lance Cpl. Michelle S. Mattei | Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton | November 05, 2010

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Camp Pendleton along with the nation is recognizing Nov. 7 as “Change your clock, change your battery” day in order to enforce the preventative actions that could be taken to reduce the risk of annual deaths and injuries caused by fires.

Camp Pendleton along with the nation is recognizing Nov. 7 as “Change your clock, change your battery” day in order to enforce the preventative actions that could be taken to reduce the risk of annual deaths and injuries caused by fires. (Photo by Photo Illustration by Lance Cpl. Michelle S. Mattei)


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MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. -- Each year, house fires are the cause of nearly 3,000 deaths in the U.S., and smoke detectors can cut that number and the risk of dying in half, according to National Fire Protection Association.

Camp Pendleton along with the nation is recognizing Nov. 7 as “Change your clock, change your battery” day in order to enforce the preventative actions that could be taken to reduce the risk of annual deaths and injuries caused by fires.

“It’s easy to remember this day because you’re already changing your clock back,” said Bill Gick, fire inspector, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton. “It’s important that we change the battery to ensure our smoke detectors are working properly.”

Smoke alarms should be installed on every level of the home, Gick explained. They need to be outside each sleeping area and inside each bedroom. Larger homes may need additional smoke alarms.

“In October, there was a woman on base who was sleeping when she heard her fire alarm go off,” said Gick. “The fire was spreading so rapidly that if she didn’t get out when she did, she wouldn’t have made it. The smoke alarm saved her life.”

Many people are complacent about their smoke alarms, said Gick. They may be in your home, but everyone must take the necessary steps toward greater home fire safety and challenge yourself to routinely inspect your smoke alarms.

“Expect the unexpected,” said Gick. “Always have an evacuation plan just in case, and prepare for the worst.

For further information about smoke detectors and the devastation that can be caused by house fires, call the base Fire Prevention office at 760-725-2703 or 760-763-2745.

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