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Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton

Dry Rollover Egress Trainers (DRET)

For scheduling of ranges and facilities you must contact the Training Support Division Reference Desk at 760-725-4444
Or email :
MCB_CAMPEN_TSD_REF_DESK@NMCI.USMC.MIL

DRET consists of the High Mobility-Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) Assistance Trainer (HEAT) and the Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected Armored Vehicle Egress Trainer (MET).

HEAT Description:

The High Mobility-Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) Assistance Trainer (HEAT) provides a realistic and relevant training environment for Marines to train tactical vehicle egress procedures in various degrees of vehicle rollover through cab doors and turret opening. HEAT training provides the opportunity to experience the effects of a vehicle rollover, receive reinforcement of the importance of wearing a seat belt, and demonstrate the procedures and effort levels required to execute vehicle egress. Training is conducted under controlled conditions, allowing vehicle occupants to gain confidence to achieve self-control in order to overcome the natural fear and panic following the catastrophic events which led to the vehicle becoming inverted.

MET Description:

The MRAP Egress Trainer (MET) is another option in addition to or in lieu of the HEAT for an overall Vehicle Safety Training Program. MET is intended to instill the training necessary to survive a rollover and understand how to egress from an inverted large vehicle by emphasizing teamwork and developing muscle memory through crew/ battle drills. With the establishment of MET's at Camp Pendleton, the HEAT & MET training courses have been combined into one training package called Dry Rollover & Egress Training (DRET).

Operational Impact:

The HEAT/MET devices are one of the final steps in an overall Vehicle Safety Training Program. HEAT/MET are intended to instill the training necessary to survive a rollover and understand how to egress from an inverted vehicle by emphasizing teamwork and developing muscle memory through crew/battle drills. According to a study reported by Helicopter World magazine in September 2000, "A person who is 'egress trained' stands a 250-percent greater chance of survival than an untrained occupant when faced with an egress emergency."