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Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton

Underwater Egress Trainers

For scheduling of facilities you must contact the Training Support Division Reference Desk at 760-725-4444
Or email :
MCB_CAMPEN_TSD_REF_DESK@NMCI.USMC.MIL

MAET Description:

The Modular Amphibious Egress Trainer is an underwater escape trainer with a generic fuselage section representing specific aircraft, amphibious, cockpits and cabin emergency escape exits. The MAET dunker functions closely to the general characteristics of a "ditched" aircraft. The MAET is capable of being lowered into a pool and turned 180 degree rotation on its longitudinal axis. Its lifting systems (hoists, gantries) provide, at a minimum, a two-speed rate of descent and retraction. The students are able to practice underwater egress from the MAET when it is in an upright position, (zero degree rotation), an inverted position, (180 degree rotation), or in any position in between zero and 180 degrees. Current systems are able to simulate CH-46, CH-53, and MV-22 configurations and are adaptable to future platforms.

SVET Description:

The Submerged Vehicle Egress Trainer is a UET that has the same modular core and rotational capabilities as the MAET, but dedicated for ground vehicle simulation. It is equipped with modules for the High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle and a generic amphibious track platform.

SWET Description:

The Shallow Water Egress Trainer is an individual seat-type device used prior to and in conjunction with the MAET and SVET to introduce water submersion and the proper use of current Supplemental Emergency Breathing Devices, such as the Intermediate Passenger Helicopter Aircrew Breathing Device (IPHABD) and Survival Egress Air (SEA) and learn to operate the LPU-32 and newer versions of flotation devices.

Operational Impact:

The purpose of the UET is to enhance operator and passenger survivability regardless of platform or the causal factors that result in a rollover or submersion incident. The UET provides a coordinated physical environment in which the mental processes taught in the classroom can be applied and practiced. This serves to make an otherwise "unfamiliar" situation "familiar" should it be encountered through an unfortunate turn of events. Marines learn to survive egress, assist the egress of other passengers when necessary, and be mentally prepared for follow-on threats should they be present.