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Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton

Frequently Asked Questions - Legal Services Support Section-West
Q. What is a living will?

A. A living will is a document that is signed by you which says that if you enter into a persistent vegetative state, such as being in a coma, you are being kept alive only by life support, and you probably are not going to be able to live without life support ever again, then you want to have life support withdrawn and die a natural death. A living will prevents your family and friends from having to make the decision of whether you should be able to die a natural death in such a situation.

Q. If I deploy, may I have my automobile lease cancelled?

A. Yes, if you deploy for more than 180 days, then you may have your automobile lease cancelled under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA), so that you won’t be paying money on a car that you are not using.

Q. What should I know before buying a car?

A. Many things, but know first and foremost that buying a car is a big financial decision and can be very complex. Take your time, and make sure that you are getting a good deal. Stay away from shady used car dealers in town who prey on Marines and sailors and pressure them into making bad financial decisions. Feel free to come see Legal Assistance before buying a car in order to see if you are making a good decision.

Q. Is there anything that I can do to safeguard my credit history when I’m on active duty?

A. Yes. If you are an active duty member of the military, you may have an active duty fraud alert placed on your credit by the three major credit reporting agencies. This active duty fraud alert will help protect you against identity theft. See the following link: http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/alerts/alt147.shtm.

Q. If I deploy or PCS, may I break my residential lease?

A. Yes. If you deploy for more than 90 days or PCS, including EAS, then the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) lets you have your lease broken. Under the SCRA, you must give written notice of termination AND a copy of your orders to your landlord, and your landlord has 30 days after the next date when rent is due before he is required to break the lease. For example, if your rent is due on the first day of each month and you give written notice of termination and a copy of your orders to your landlord on 4 April, then your landlord has 30 days after 1 May, the next date when rent is due, before he is required to break the lease. So, the earliest date when the lease would have to be broken is 31 May.