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Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton

"The West Coast's Premier Fleet Marine Force Training Base"

Marines, airmen train to move personnel, equipment

By Courtesy Story | Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton | November 13, 2020

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Marines with 1st Marine Division and airmen with 39th Airlift Squadron out of Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, loaded equipment and personnel into five C-130J Super Hercules aircraft as part of a static loading operation aboard Marine Corps Air Station Camp Pendleton, California, Nov. 5-6.

The evolution served as loadmaster training for the airmen in preparation for their upcoming deployment, while providing an opportunity for familiarization training for the division’s mobility personnel.

“For us, it's a lot of pre-deployment training,” said U.S Air Force 1st Lt. Jordan Paecht, a C-130J pilot with the 39th Airlift Squadron. “We are loading a lot of equipment that would not be available at our home unit.”

The Marine Corps has limited cargo transportation capabilities, often relying on other services to provide strategic lift assets that enable Marines to deploy with their equipment around the world. Training with the Air Force allows the division’s mobility personnel to become more efficient in loading equipment, safely and properly, said U.S. Marine Chief Warrant Officer 4 Greg Myers, the air mobility officer for 1st MarDiv.

Some of the vehicles and gear loaded into the C-130s were M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems, Joint Light Tactical Vehicles and M777A2 lightweight 155 mm howitzers.

“No Marine is far from the battlefield, that's what we are trying to do here,” said U.S. Marine Staff Sgt. Dallas Smith, the flight clearance chief with MCAS Camp Pendleton. “We are testing the efficiency of getting the troops on the ground to where they need to be. Being one of the smaller air stations within the Marine Corps, people often overlook the fact that we can support large aircraft and their strategic lift capability.”

The air station plays a significant role in supporting the mission of units stationed at Camp Pendleton and other installations along the West Coast. With more than 6,000 feet of runway, the air station is capable of supporting large aircraft like the C-130J, C-17 Globemaster III and C-5 Galaxy. Bringing those aircraft to Camp Pendleton gives the tenant units the capability of moving gear and personnel in an expeditious manner all around the globe.

The evolution served as loadmaster training for the airmen in preparation for their upcoming deployment, while providing an opportunity for familiarization training for the division’s mobility personnel.

“For us, it's a lot of pre-deployment training,” said U.S Air Force 1st Lt. Jordan Paecht, a C-130J pilot with the 39th Airlift Squadron. “We are loading a lot of equipment that would not be available at our home unit.”

The Marine Corps has limited cargo transportation capabilities, often relying on other services provide strategic lift assets that enable Marines to deploy with their equipment around the world. Training with the Air Force allows the division’s mobility personnel to become more efficient in loading equipment, safely and properly, said U.S. Marine Chief Warrant Officer 4 Greg Myers, the air mobility officer for 1st MarDiv.

Some of the vehicles and gear loaded into the C-130s were M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems, Joint Light Tactical Vehicles and M777A2 lightweight 155 mm howitzers.

“No Marine is far from the battlefield, that's what we are trying to do here,” said U.S. Marine Staff Sgt. Dallas Smith, the flight clearance chief with MCAS Camp Pendleton. “We are testing the efficiency of getting the troops on the ground to where they need to be. Being one of the smaller air stations within the Marine Corps, people often overlook the fact that we can support large aircraft and their strategic lift capability.”

The air station plays a significant role in supporting the mission of units stationed at Camp Pendleton and other installations along the West Coast. With the over 6,000 feet runway, the air station is capable of supporting large aircraft like the C-130J, C-17 Globemaster III and C-5 Galaxy. Bringing those aircraft to Camp Pendleton gives the tenant units the capability of moving gear and personnel in an expeditious manner all around the globe.


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