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Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton

Competing in a devil dog-eat-dog world

By Cpl. Derrick K. Irions | Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton | February 26, 2013

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Sgt. Ricardo D. Torres, an aviation intermediate level structures mechanic with Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron here, listens to career advice given to him from Gunnery Sgt. Jeremy L. Hammock, a Manpower Management Support Branch–50 career counselor. Marines attending Sergeant’s Course received one-on-one occupational guidance to improve their chances for promotion during a visit from MMSB–50 here Feb. 19 - 21.

Sgt. Ricardo D. Torres, an aviation intermediate level structures mechanic with Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron here, listens to career advice given to him from Gunnery Sgt. Jeremy L. Hammock, a Manpower Management Support Branch–50 career counselor. Marines attending Sergeant’s Course received one-on-one occupational guidance to improve their chances for promotion during a visit from MMSB–50 here Feb. 19 - 21. (Photo by Cpl. Derrick K. Irions)


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Sgt. Michael T. Henson, an electronics maintenance technician with the 11th Marine Regiment, explains his career situation to Gunnery Sgt. Jeremy L. Hammock, a Manpower Management Support Branch–50 career counselor, before receiving professional advice from Hammock. Marines attending Sergeant’s Course received one-on-one occupational guidance to improve their chances for promotion during a visit from MMSB–50 here Feb. 19-21.

Sgt. Michael T. Henson, an electronics maintenance technician with the 11th Marine Regiment, explains his career situation to Gunnery Sgt. Jeremy L. Hammock, a Manpower Management Support Branch–50 career counselor, before receiving professional advice from Hammock. Marines attending Sergeant’s Course received one-on-one occupational guidance to improve their chances for promotion during a visit from MMSB–50 here Feb. 19-21. (Photo by Cpl.Derrick K. Irions)


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CAMP PENDLETON --

Gaining the upper hand on peers, in a highly competitive environment like the Marine Corps, can be a daunting challenge for those seeking to ascend quickly through the ranks.

Marines attending Sergeant’s Course at the Staff Non-Commissioned Officer Academy here received one-on-one occupational guidance to improve their chances for promotion during a visit from Manpower Management Support Branch – 50 Feb. 19 - 21.

Many aspects of a Marine’s career are considered when determining the best candidate for a promotion.

Gunnery Sgt. Jeremy L. Hammock, the MMSB-50 enlisted career counselor, who conducted the counseling sessions, said qualities like a high physical fitness test score, additional civilian education, deployments and the completion of a special duty assignment can be highly influential factors that members of a reviewing board look for when reviewing promotion packages.

Being highly competitive is necessary for those who intend on continuing their Corps career and are nearing the end of their current contract or are in slow promoting job fields and may only be given one chance to go before a promotional board.

“I want to know where I stand and compare to my peers,” said Sgt. Ricardo D. Torres, an aviation intermediate level structures mechanic with Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron here, who has served on three combat deployments and was promoted to the rank of sergeant three years ago.

The advisor informed Torres that he is a very competitive candidate for promotion after reviewing Torres’ accomplishments and fitness reports.

“I have a lot of non-observed (fitness reports) and I was worried about how that might be viewed,” Torres explained. “(The career counselor) told me that they aren’t really negative, things and hearing that made me feel a little better about my chance for promotion.”

Torres already submitted a special-duty assignment package for recruiting duty to continue setting himself apart from his peers while climbing the ladder of success in the Corps. 

Hammock said whether those Sergeant’s Course students plan to exit the Corps or intend on adding additional years onto their military contracts, they now have a better understanding of how to proceed in their futures.

“The bottom line is being able to fully understand how you are being measured,” he said. “If you understand that you will understand how to improve (your chances for promotion).”

For more information contact your career counselor.

 

Contact Cpl. Derrick K. Irions at derrick.irions@usmc.mil

ImageGunnery Sgt. Jeremy L. Hammock ImageHeadquarters and Headquarters Squadron ImageManpower Management Support Branch – 50 ImageMarine Corps ImageMMSB-50 ImageSergeant’s Course ImageSgt. Ricardo D. Torres

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